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Full text of "Regulations for the proper construction, maintenance and operation of standard painted bulletin advertising plants as prescribed by the members of the Outdoor Advertising Association United States and Canada"

^^-V^vt^^ln, 




We OUTDOOR 
cXDVERTISING tXSSOCIATION 




GENERAL INFORMATION 

ON PLANT CONSTRUCTION AND 

MAINTENANCE 

MAY 1, 1917 




REGULATIONS 



FOR THE 



PROPER CONSTRUCTION, MAINTENANCE 
AND OPERATION 



OF 



Standard Painted Bulletin Advertising Plants 

AS PRESCRIBED BY THE MEMBERS 

OF 

THE OUTDOOR ADVERTISING ASSOCIATION 
UNITED STATES AND CANADA 




THE OUTDOOR ADVERTISING ASSOCIATION 

19 17 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
Duke University Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/regulationsforprOOoutd 



PREFACE 

THIS publication is intended primarily as a text-book for the purpose of care- 
fully and plainly outlining to every member of the Outdoor Advertising 
Association the requirements with reference to the construction, maintenance 
and operation of painted bulletin advertising plants and the service which 
this Association demands from each of its members. Every member is urged to 
keep this text-book constantly before him and to carefully and thoroughly live up 
to all of the regulations contained herein. 

A uniform standard structure with uniform high-grade service delivered in 
every city and town throughout the country is the essential thing for the success 
of outdoor advertising, and each member is urged to do his share toward accom- 
plishing this end by adhering strictly to all of the specifications, standards, rules 
and regulations set down in this book. 

An additional purpose is to help in further developing that service and to 
ultimately secure for the users of outdoor advertising throughout the United States 
and Canada an absolute standard which will be as near perfect as human 
limitations will permit. 

To promote and assure this result the Association has adopted a rigid system 
of plant inspection. Competent inspectors constantly cover every section of the 
country, and their duties are to see that members maintain this standard service 
at all times, and also to promote the extension of the service furnished advertisers 
to every city, town and hamlet within our jurisdiction. 

Separate and enlarged copies of all plans of construction shown herein may 
be obtained at a nominal cost from the Secretary. 



[PAGE THRHKl 



CONSTRUCTION OF PAINTED BULLETIN BOARDS 

The physical condition of painted bulletin plants is becoming a larger factor 
every day as an aid in selling the medium, and as a means of bringing about a 
lower cost of plant maintenance. 

The plans submitted in this publication have been drawn after careful study 
and exhaustive tests of the various types of structures built by the members. Al- 
though the type of construction set forth herein may appear new and different 
to some of the members, it is suggested that all members adhere rigidly to these 
plans by reason of the fact that they will provide safe structures, while the material 
required is not in excess of the material required for any other structure of the 
same size which may offer an equal resistance to wind pressure. It must be borne 
in mind that the strength of any timber in a frame or bent cannot beneficially exert 
its strength unless it is so fastened within the frame that it may receive the full 
strength from any other member or members. For this reason it is necessary 
that the proper size of nails and the requisite number should be used in all joints 
as shown in the plans. These plans provide for structures to withstand a wind 
pressure of 30 tbs. per square foot, which is the pressure exerted by a wind with a 
velocity of seventy-five miles per hour. Many city ordinances require that all 
structures be built to withstand such a wind and as it is the desire of the members 
of the Association to build their structures equally as strong as the best class of 
buildings in the town or city, it is strongly urged that all members adhere as closely 
as possible to the plans given herein. It is also suggested that the plant owners 
familiarize themselves with the names of the various members in a bent or frame, 
as shown in these plans, for these are the terms used in common practice and in 
a discussion of the method of building bulletin boards with other plant owners, 
or more particularly, city engineers, they may make themselves clearly understood. 

The use of the Kleiser anchor, which is made of a 4x6, five feet long w^ith two 
or four wedges as specified in the plans, has shown by actual test in the various 
kinds of soil a strength equal to double that of the old type of 6x8 anchor with 
dead-men. The use of 4x6 timber for anchors permits of the use of short pieces 
of post material which heretofore may have accumulated or may have been used 
to a disadvantage as splices. 

It is recommended that the members of the Association seek information from 
the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, w^ith regard to the 
treatment of their local timber for preserving the same against deterioration when 
placed in the ground. Although the proper treatment of anchors and the lower 
ends of posts may increase the first cost of construction, this practice should eas- 
ily repay the plant owner by means of a lower cost of maintenance and in the 
increased safety of the boards which is a large asset in the form of insurance. 



[PAGE FOUR] 



STANDARDIZATION OF PLANTS 

Resolution adopted Nov. 24th, 1916 that each plant owner be noti- 
fied that he must begin immediately to put his plant into proper units 
and that he must equip all regular city bulletins with pilcisters as illustrat- 
ed in the Book of Instructions. This to apply to boards outside of those 
of a De Luxe type or Semi-De Luxe type, and that there shall be a col- 
umn at the end of each unit or sign. 



THE FOLLOWING SPECIFICATIONS 
WERE ADOPTED: 

No. 1. There shall be a standard moulding at least 5 inches wide with a 
2 inch cap which shall extend 4 inches in front of the face of 
the sign. 

No. 2. Color of mouldings and pilasters on regular plant to be one of 
the following neutral colors: Old Gold, Old Ivory, Gray or 
White. 

No. 3. The width of column as adopted shall be used uniformly through- 
out the entire plant. 

No. 4. A neutral color mat is recommended, to be 10 to 15 inches at 
top and bottom, and from 10 to 24 inches at ends, but must 
be uniform in size throughout the plant. 

No. 5. When a standard form of construction has been arrived at it is 
recommended that a book containing details of the same be 
issued by the Association. Also that this committee be au- 
thorized to issue said book. 

Resolution unaminously adopted February 27, 1917. 

Within one year from date all members should have at least fifty 
per cent of their bulletins readjusted to conform to the new requirements 
of Pilasters, Mats, 35 foot Units, Separation from Bill Posting, etc. 



rPAGE FIVE] 



STANDARD SECTIONS 




ILLUSTRATION No. 5 

Showing the face of standard section, 5 
feet wide by 1 feet high, made of 26 
gauge unannealed galvanized sheet steel. 



ILLUSTRATION No. 6 

Representing the back of standard section 
illustrating method of stiffening batten on 
back of section by use of galvanized sheet 
steel cleats. 




I PAGE SIX] 



TREATMENT OF SECTIONS 

It has been found necessary to treat the galvanized surface of steel sections in 
some manner to remove the glossy and apparently greasy surface from the steel 
in order to obtain a surface to vs^hich paint will satisfactorily adhere. 

Various acids have been used for this purpose w^ith varying results. In some 
cases the acids have been so strong as to destroy the effect of the galvanizing 
with the resultant deterioration of the sections. In other cases weak acids have 
not sufficiently removed the glossy surface and the paint has a tendency to flake off. 

The manufacturers advise that no acid of any kind be used to treat the steel, 
as all must naturally tend to destroy the galvanizing. It is their recommendation 
that the steel sheets be permitted to stand wholly exposed to the weather for a 
period of six months in which time the surface will oxidize to such an extent that 
a surface will be created to which paint will readily adhere. 

Such treatment though highly commendable is somewhat impracticable, and a 
strong acid vinegar is being largely used for the purpose of treating sections. 

The vinegar is applied with a brush immediately upon completion of the sec- 
tion. The section is then stood on edge which permits it to drain and may be 
used as soon as the vinegar is dry. 

Members who have found satisfactory methods of treating sections should send 
the Secretary full information concerning same, that all may be advised and bene- 
fited. 



[r.VGE SEVE.NJ 



STANDARD MOULDING 





TOP MOULDING 

Full Size 



BOTTOM MOULDING 

Full Size 



[PAGE EIGHT] 



STANDARD MOULDING 

On page Eight is shown in full size detail the standard moulding for paint bulle- 
tin boards. 

Experience has shown that the top and bottom edges of the paint sections 
should be obscured from view in order to obtain a neat and pleasing sign. There- 
fore, to hide the irregularities of the top and bottom edges of the sections the mould- 
ing is designed with the idea that one-half inch of the ends of the sections shall be 
covered. 

On plan marked "G-3" will be found a detail showing the manner in which 
this moulding is erected. It will be noted that the top moulding is rabbitted or cut 
out to a depth of one and one-half inches, but the moulding is so set that it covers 
but the top one-half inch of the section. This is done in order that the section may 
be readily lifted up and slipped out of the bottom moulding or replaced by a reverse 
action without the necessity of loosening the moulding. 

This construction also tends to hold the sections in place and is just as economi- 
cal as the old type of moulding which had the same face detail and was fastened 
in place with a one inch backing or furring strip. The moulding as shown is merely 
the combination of the old type of moulding and the backing and furring strip 
which heretofore was nailed on separately. 

At present it is a common practice to fasten the sections in place with spikes. 
Experience has shown that in the course of time sections become badly battered 
and defaced from constant nailing and this one thing of all others contributes to- 
ward defaced and unsatisfactory boards. 

It is strongly recommended that sections be fastened in place by the use of 
metal straps, an inch wide and 1 5 to 18 inches long, which are usually cut from the 
ends of steel sheets when trimming the same for correct sizes to be made into sec- 
tions. These strips can be passed between the batten and steel face of the sec- 
tions; the two ends then bent down or up over the stringer and fastened with one 
8d nail. 

Other satisfactory section holders, but more expensive and complicated, have 
been designed and some are at present in use, but it would appear that a good deal 
of thought might be given to this one subject in hope that a more satisfactory solu- 
tion might be reached. 



[PAGE ni>;ki 



SINGLE DECK BOARDS 

G-5, on the opposite pages, shows plans covering the construction of single 
deck boards built on level ground and in deep basements. 

It will be noted that 2x6's are shown for top and bottom stringers; also the 
Kleiser anchor has been shown in preference to the old type of anchor. The use 
of 2x6 stringers and the use of the Kleiser anchor are strongly recommended in 
order to meet the provisions of the many city ordinances w^hich require that a 
bulletin board withstand a lateral wind pressure of from 25 to 30 fbs. per square 
foot of exposed surface. 



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For >^"» 6" /Inchor S-O /orj^ 
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as or Post beion'. [O? 



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equa/ fo J /fye /■ofa/ he/g/j/' of doarc/ obo^e ^roc'rpc/ //'ne. 
fbr bocyrd^ in /O/t^. l)ajemer?/-s , <¥?e /ec/.^er sha// ixe 
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iv//h 2-40S :$p>'tres. 



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Z H'edt/es used 



Fl/ja/i 




SINGLE DECK BOARD 



m 













.f^ 



The illustration above shows the manner of bracing a single deck board built in a 

six (6) foot basement. 



[PAGE FIFTEEN] 



DOUBLE DECK SET-BACK BOARDS 

G-6, on the opposite pages, illustrates the proper method of construction for 
double deck boards built on level ground and in deep basements. 

It will be noted that 2x6's are shown for top and bottom stringers; also the 
Kleiser anchor has been shown in preference to the old type of anchor. The use 
of 2x6 stringers and the use of the Kleiser anchor are strongly recommended in 
order to meet the provisions of the many city ordinances which require that a 
poster board withstand a lateral wind pressure of from 25 to 30 lbs. per square 
foot of exposed surface. 



[P.\OE SIXTEEN] 



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of p^proA .45° a/^ a /7?a^//7?o'J7 spaong of one dr-ace /<? Gt^ery -^j ^ 
/rsn bGrj/s. >y/T^re ^e Soor-d /s o^er- 30 f^. h/gS ihe brace % N 
/J /p cross 4pane/j. TTre^e c/raiv/ngs o)re on fhs dos/s 
o/ /he ^ard Ae/ng raised 2 ft- aboi^e ,s/de>va/M /e^eJ. ^ 
Jm3y Brz/ces or? BacM 3rcs ^ /'?aye o /7?ajr/rrK'/T7 sp<jano qf/Opar?€/s. ' § 

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DOUBLE DECK SET-BACK BOARDS 




>;, •TTY' 



The above photograph illustrates the method of construction of a double deck board 

built on level ground. 



tTAGE T\VKNTY-OXi:i 



DOUBLE DECK FLUSH-FACE BOARDS 

G-10 shows a plan for the construction of a double deck flush-face board. The 
use of this type of board is being discontinued, the set-back double deck rapidly tak- 
ing its place. The plan is shown, however, for those who may desire to build such 
boards, but the material for such boards is not given in the material list. Parti- 
cular note should be taken of the fact that the plan provides for the use of an an- 
chor 6 ft. long, in place of the usual 5 ft. ; also provides that the posts be set in the 
ground a depth of 4 ft., instead of the usual 3 ft. The back brace is made of two 
2x6's running from the anchor to a point opposite the middle of the board. 



fPAGE TWENTY-TWO] 



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t k k * J '*/" P'^" '°' '^"^ construction of a cjouble deck Hush-face board. I he use of this type of board is being discontinued, the set-back double deck rapidly taking its place. The plan is shown, however, for those who may desire to build such boards, but the material 

tor such boards is not given in the material list. Particular note should be taken of the fact that the plan provides for the use of an anchor 6 ft. long, in place of the usual 5 ft.; also provides that the posts be set in the ground a depth of 4 ft., instead of the usual 3 ft. The 
back brace is made of two 2x6-s running from the anchor to a point opposite the middle of the board. 



i 



DOUBLE DECK SET-BACK BOARDS 




Shown above is a photograph illustrating the manner of construction of a double deck 

board built in a deep basement. 



tr.VGK TWEXTT-FIVKI 



MATERIAL LIST 

On the opposite page are tables showing the material required for boards built 
on level ground or in 4 ft., 6 ft. or 10 ft. basements and of varying lengths, from 
25 to 100 ft. 

It will be noted in the accompanj'ing table that 2x6's have been specified for 
both top and bottom stringers. Heretofore, 2x4's have had a large general use 
as top and bottom stringers, but more recently the trend has been for wider string- 
ers, which provide additional strength and furnish more nailing surface. To pro- 
vide a strength sufficient to withstand a wind with a velocity of seventy-five miles 
an hour, it is necessary to employ 2x6 stringers, top and bottom, and for this rea- 
son they are specified in this table and their use is strongly recommended. 

It will be noted that provision has been made in the table for the use of the 
Kleiser anchor, as shown in plan G-5. Since this type of anchor develops a 
strength equal to twice that of the old style anchor at an equal or less cost, its 
use is strongly recommended. These anchors can be made from short pieces of 
post material. However, it is a very simple matter for those w^ho may vs^ish to use 
2x4 stringers, top and bottom, and the old type of anchor to make these changes 
in the table. 

Under the heading "Single Deck Boards" and under the classification of "Ground 
Level," the material is given for boards from 25 to 100 ft. in length, which are 
built on level ground, the bottom of the capping being 2 ft. above the ground and 
1 ft. sections being used. 

To obtain from the table the material required for a 50 ft. single deck board 
built on level ground, look first for the table headed "Material for Single Deck 
Boards." On the left margin look for the classification "Ground Level Boards; ' 
across the top of this table is given the lengths of boards in multiples of five, be- 
ginning with 25 ft. Under 50 ft. as given on the line marked "Length of Board" 
will be found the material required. For instance, the first figure under "50 ft." 
is 7; reading across from the left, this will be "anchors," 4x6 in. by 5 ft. — seven 
is the number required. The next figure under seven is fourteen ; reading across 
from the left under "wedges," 4x6 in. by 1 ft. — fourteen are required. By con- 
tinuing down this column, the following material will be found to be necessary: 



Posts 


4x6 in. 


by 


16 


ft. 7 












Back braces 


2x6 " 




15 


7 












Stringers 


2x4 " 




14 


2; 


and 


1, 


11 


ft. 


long 


Stringers 


2x6 " 




14 


" 4; 


and 


2. 


11 


ft. 


long 


Splices 


2x4 " 




4 


2 












Splices 


2x6 " 




4 


4 












Baseboard 


1x6 " 




9 


2; 


and 


2, 


16 


ft. 


long 



This is the material required to complete the framework for a board 50 ft. 
long built on level ground, the bottom capping being 2 ft. therefrom. 

Since the material required for the face of all boards of the same length, 
whether built on level ground or in basements is the same, to avoid repetition 
this material has been listed at the bottom of the table marked "Material for Single 
Deck Boards." Under the classification of "Facing" will be found the required 
amount of top moulding, bottom moulding, sections, head-board, bottom capping, 
top capping, end capping and pilasters. 



LPAGE TWENTV-SIX] 



Matei^ial ¥or I Single 






Deck' 3oard5 





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/-rd and J-/0 



(^ir '.! 



■J a re fo ^e 



amy one ip 
/n Tal>/e. 
/o^ the ncirvk 
•ares is the 

reat'irfc f?' 
7r 



'fbon^, 



// :s desirei'^ 
jJieires ^aj\ 
ca /i^'a 



md li 



paced 'o ffje 



ce /J osed, 

^ii'en in 
nam/^et or 

Ip'- iQz 



a SO Seard. 

if/ieke inches are 
\gimi 



fo saPsfdafe 
fie used, or 

'irrr^'v^- 



MATERIAL LIST 

It can be readily understood that the material given for boards in 4, 6 and 10 
ft. basements is the same material that is required for boards which may be built 
on level ground, but w^hich are raised 6. 8 and I 2 ft. above the ground. In other 
words, the material for a ground level board provides for the board to be raised 2 
ft. above the ground; the material for a board in a 4 ft. basement provides for the 
board to be raised 2 ft. above the sidewalk or 6 ft. above the ground. In the case 
of the material for a 6 ft. basement, the table provides for the erection of a board, 
the bottom of which is 2 ft. above the sidewalk or 8 ft. above the ground; the 
material for a 1 ft. basement similarly provides materials for a board, the bottom 
of which is 1 2 ft. above the ground. 

The material for double deck boards with the upper deck set back 3 ft. will 
be found in the table marked "Double Deck Boards," the same form being used 
as in the case of single deck boards, with the exception that the material for the 
platform between the upper and lower decks is given in a separate table, bearing 
the heading "Upper Deck Platform." 

It is often necessary to build a rail fence around lots and in the table marked 
"Rail Fence" is given the material required for a rail fence three feet high with 
4x4 posts at 8 ft. centers and with a 2x4 top member resting on the posts and two 
I x6 rails. 



ir.VUK TWIC.NTY-.N'INEJ 



SPECIFICATIONS FOR SINGLE DECK BOARD BUILT ON SOLID ROCK 

FOUNDATION 



ANCHOR 



ROCK 
DRILLING 



UPRIGHT 

UPPER 
STRUCTURE 



Anchor used to be forged out of 3x^ in. iron, 8 in. long, and 
then tapered to 3;^ jn. square and barbed on edges. 

Rock to be drilled, leaving a 1 in. hole in diameter, 9 in. deep; 
set anchor in same, then fill balance of space with melted lead 
and cork tight. 

Bottom of upright should be cut to rock level, and then cross 
brace to be bolted to anchor with three (3) flj in. cross bolts. 

Follow regulation construction. 



[PAGE THIRTV] 



BOARD ON ROCK FOUNDATION 

This illustration indicates the proper method of construction where 
the earth formation is solid rock. 








D&TAlL-,SHOUJl(VIG 



PieuATion-of- 

■TyP!^ALBEA<:e 



_J 



rr.\nr; thiutv-<)Xi;i 



BOARD ON MARSHY GROUND 

This illustration indicates the proper method of construction where 
the earth formation is marshy land. 



vvi 



Q 
V 

X 

a. 


UJnL 
Q.I 

, z 

(Oj 

to 



w 



2-xS CAP 



to 



INHERE GKOU/~ID /3 7-00 SOFT f=OR 

SiHOL^ ■^''<G-j</orr PILES AS Shown 
■^'j/e'x /orr: p/tes as jllust/^^teo 



ro ar Too SO^T f=0/^ SOLlO 
OeAff/f^a O^ A S/iWGLC 

U'/^iv or rffAMS; sp^/ci^ 
O/v y</~/orHeK -^'xe'Ji/on 
V5 /<c^ usT/TAreo He/ve: 





/C/Vi»A' A STffo^ar/? A/~^CHOif 
roff THC z- xs-x /e^r BRACC- 
AT ffCAff OF FFAHe '5 TMOi/Ofl. 

/^EcessARy, use co/v^r/wc- 

T/o/-/ SHOyVI-^ MER^- 



•3 IDE View of/^i^ame 



(PAGE THIRTY-TWO] 



SPECIFICATION FOR DOUBLE DECK BOARD ON PROPERTY WHERE 
ONLY 5 FEET OF LAND FOR BRACING IS AVAILABLE 

(Shown on next page) 



DIGGING OF 
TRENCH 

REAR 
BRACING 



Dig trench in ground 8 ft. long. 2 ft. wide and 6 ft. deep. 

Build rear truss, or bracing, of 4x6 in. uprights, front and rear; 
then place diagonal and longitudinal braces in position, same to 
be 2x4 in. ; set completed brace into trench, level same, then fill 
in with cinder, or sand and gravel concrete, proportion two (2) 
parts to one ( 1 ) part cement. 

Proceed building face of structure as per regulation. 

Rear of structure to have longitudinal bracing 2x4 to be placed 
at every connection, in order to avoid distortion; then place 
diagonal bracing at alternate planes. 



rr.VOR TUirvTY-TIirtKKl 



BOARD WITH TOWER BRACING 

This illustration indicates the proper method of construction where 

braces are impossible. 



-l?)©UBLe-Df:^K- 
•B0ARD-BU1LT- 

1 5- available:- : 



DETAIL 0/O05r- 
^ETinQ3n^T^ETE- 



«^r9J90E- le-J^t 



' CjM^£^CjiAa:Xj^S- 




~/^ffVt — 



LPAGK THIUTY-FUUU] 



STANDARD CORNER CONSTRUCTION 





.Above IS shown the proper manner of finishing the corner where two boards join, the 
grades of which vary to a considerable extent. It will be noted from the photograph that 
the moulding is run through to a joint on the plumb line and sheet metal is bent to define 
a sharp corner and set between the pilasters, the corner being shown as plumb. 



nwuio tiiii;tv-kivi:i 



ROOF BOARDS 

On the adjoining pages are shown plans for the construction of both wooden and 
steel bulletin boards which can be readily erected on the average roof. The plan 
for the wooden frame calls for similar construction to that used for ground boards, 
only the anchorage in particular being different. The plan of the steel frame is 
identical in type and with the exception of the sway bracing, is merely a sub- 
stitution of steel members for w^ooden members. 

The 4x6 sills running parallel with the board serve to distribute the load and 
although they may appear to be unnecessary, usually are a wise means to pre- 
vent vibration and consequently, leaks in the roof. 

It will be noted that the bolts which secure the 4x6 cross-stringers to the raft- 
ers are placed in such a way as to permit them to be readily flashed with hot as- 
phalt or other waterproofing material. Experience has shown that where a bolt 
passes through a timber lying directly on the roof and then immediately through 
the water-tight roofing, it is nearly always the source of a leak, for reason of the 
inaccessibility of the bolt, furthered by the fact that the water has a tendency to 
follow along the side of a timber lying directly on the roof, owing to the fact that 
such a timber usually interferes with the natural drainage on the roof. It will be 
noted that the bolts, front and rear, pass through the roof and through a 4x4 
timber which crosses under at least two rafters. It must be borne in mind that 
a roof board has the same tendency to pull up the roof at the point where the 
back brace is fastened as does the brace on a ground board to pull up the anchor. 
The nuts on the bolts through the roof in all cases should be drawn up very tight- 
ly, as the vibration of a roof due to loose connections will soon break the water- 
proof coating and leaks will immediately ensue. The vibration of boards and 
roofs on locations which are in nowise protected from the wind can be materially 
relieved by the use of cables secured to the top of the board and fastened to 
fire-walls or secured to other anchorage. Their use is strongly recommended. 

Particular attention should be given to the sway bracing of all roof signs to 
provide for their rigidity w^hen the wind strikes the boards at an angle. There 
is a tendency on the part of the plant owners to brace their boards, both roof and 
ground boards, to provide only for the wind striking directly against the face or 
the back. The lack of sway bracing is a dangerous omission and such sway braces 
as are shown in the plan should be employed. 



[PAGE THIRTY-SIX] 




>//$>/'' 



-4''.4-' cfossina under ftiv rafters- 

•Bent For Roof- scaiei-i-a- 

TT -U- 



13 



Rafter-j 



-- - u [ 



I 
4^ 



R'a/fi 



=3=1,!= 






-t-r- 



• P/IRT Pl/^N -Looking 



UP. 



8-Ojhouf 



Spacintj o'f Bents about 3-0' cerrl^r To center 








^ na/l mih ^ ■^- /Z each s/a^j..^.^. 



jSheafh/n^-^^, ' 




Pe/jr El £Mr/ON 



I 



■jf' Zander ftro ra/t'en 



7 






-_--"" /€;//^ 



-4*4 irass/n^ unc/er tmp 






rafters 



ifysha-j'on a// Bo/ts 




'Roof /1nCH0R/I6E DET/JIL- 5ca/e /"-/-O. 




n?r 3<xra of 89. 10 II or ii Bents Brace center and en:^ panels. 
Fiy Board cf S.4S ^ Or 7 Berrts Brace end panels onlu. 



^r/naer-j 



.rir/itl 



Sfri'^f^-} 




^ 




^. 



JtnrT^r-^ 



3^naer-y 



ftrf/ift 



Jf>7f7^fr:i 



\ 




Pl^n of 
Roof Bomo- 




-.SR/^dNG or WOOD n?^fY7£ ■ 





si^/^CiNS or srrci. ri?/ifyrr 



NOT£ /?c>of musf not i>e i^ntken except h- pass^^e of i'ivlfs, 
trhicti muil ffe fharoi/anli^' /laslJei^ 
Drama fe of roof must mi be oiafructed encept l>y f. H' lyecf^es j/rotfn 



.Stringei — 7 




Al Smry Braart^ connections - l-e Bolt 






■'4*^'4- unc^r /ffT? ra/ferj . 



3*^^fr/nger 




ii-'i}'ii 

Sfay Brace £ 



'Bent fok RooF'Scaiei:'/-o- 

A/OT£- /Jnchora^e tt> t?oof same as stmvn aiare. 



STANDARD CORNER CONSTRUCTION 
DOUBLE DECK BOARD 




The above illustration shows the manner in which the corners on a double deck set- 
back board may be finished in a neat and simple way. 



[PAGE FORTY-ONE] 



f$: 



^1 



Jt 



II 



>>•)- 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 1 



'Side ^ie^- 

•'j3H0mN6 End P/LflSTER' 



Se/en 
^ yride 




Z '■4' Capping 



^ 



' £L£i^/lTION or • 
- Inte/^medi^te PiLRSTER' 




Section or Pil/^steR' 



/eeqa/a^/on MM cut to ^jf oi^er mold/n^ of hoard 



irs made se/xirvfe and 
/rrferchon^eai'/e - Top 8~ Bottom 



Sca/eM'=/-0'- 



' SfTcr/o^y a.- a 



LPAGE FURTY-TWO] 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 1 



*-y-iUjiiUJi4Lij^ 




It will be noted that the pilaster shown above differs from the other three standard 
designs by reason of the fact that it has no base. A base may be added, however, if de- 
sired. 

When used without a base, -it is readily adaptable to any bulletin board no matter what 
height the same is above the ground. It is also readily adaptable to use on double deck 
boards, and as may be judged from the accompanying photographs, a bulletin board finish- 
ed with these pilasters is given a most attractive finish. 

These pilasters are made in a very simple way and all short, scrap pieces of regula- 
tion moulding may be used in making the caps for same. 

This is one of the four standard types of pilasters adopted by the Association. 



IIWGK FUKTV-THIIEEI 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 2 







A J 







The pilaster shown above is one of the four designs adopted by the Outdoor Advertis- 
ing Association. On the opposite page is reproduced a line drawing, showing the manner of 
construction and the way in which it is attached to the board. 

These pilasters, it will be noted from the photograph, give a board a very pleasing 
appearance, and if kept well painted, v/ill prove an attraction to any plant. 



tPAGK FOnTY-FOUrO 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 2 



J.* itrffe, 





ica^f J/tf^~.f'~o" 




De/a//i of De Zaxe Co/) 






f^u// 5/ze 
Cross Sec//o/ts 



DOUBLE DECK FLUSH-FACE BOARD 




Above is an illustration of a double deck, flush-face board, showing the use of pilasters 

on both upper and lower decks. 



irAi_;K FuUTY-SEVKN] 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 3 



,\\^/A\ 



\ 




/2' 



X 



< 



< 



< 



■^ 



^1, 



Top made separate 
I ^''' and set on Capping 



s < iA N '.nv '<^vv \ ^.<nU/mv^ ^^y^y -'a^ \j//s^f/^iK^/^^\\y'/\^'/i\ v'^^^w/' a.j, vx<\yt u^^sj-'' 'Ks^/t^ \/^^ \ 'ycy^x 




5iPE \/iEh^- -Ele/zition- OF- 'Sect/on or P/L/JSTER- 

'5H0mN6-END PlL/15TER- ■ JnTERMEDI/JTE P/LflSTER- Jcak:§.~^/'0' 

The above illustration shows one of four designs adopted by the Association, and how 
attractive a board may be made by the use of such pilasters, the construction of which is 
shown on the opposite page. 

These pilasters are of very simple construction and can be fastened to any standard 
board with very little work. 



[P.VGE FORTY-EIOHT] 



STANDARD PILASTER No. 4 



mrti±tmfn^/! to J>e made se/>an3tr 




>v;:\!vV'in'.w/-'M.\'-. 



•5lDE l/lEW ' ' £^L£//7r/OA/ OF^ 'S£CT/ON OF P/L/^STER' 

* ^HOwiNo £np Pilaster- 'Intermedi/ite PjiffsrER* 'S^aJe:i- /■-(?: 

Above is shown a photograph of a round pilaster which has been in use for some time, 
and which has been adopted by the Association as one of the four standard designs. These 
pilasters, although somewhat difficult of construction, and possibly somewhat more expen- 
sive than the other standard designs, are a very attractive ornament to a painted bulletin 
board. 



[PAr.K KOUTV-NINE] 



ANCHOR TESTS 

On page Fifty-one is shown a suggested method for testing the relative strengths 
of different types of anchors. The plan shown does not provide for any measure- 
ment of the stress required to cause failure in any anchor, but does provide a 
means whereby the old standard anchor may be tested against any suggested types 
in the nature of an experiment. In testing the relative strengths of different an- 
chors, it must be borne in mind that the strength of any anchor is directly depend- 
ent upon the soil in w^hich it is imbedded, consequently, all tests should be made in 
such a way as to provide the same soil for imbedding the opposing anchors. Ex- 
haustive tests made by members of the Association have gone to show that of 
the loose soils, sand offers the greatest resistance. An anchor imbedded wholly 
in sand is found to be stronger than an anchor imbedded in a sandy soil but sur- 
rounded by crushed rock. This proved true in both the case of the old style an- 
chor and the Kleiser type. Anchors set in brick-bats showed the least strength 
of any tested. In the plan provision is made for the use of two anchors of any 
type on one side to test the strength of any one anchor on the opposite side, if the 
conditions warrant the same. 



[PAGE FIFTY] 






&1 



^ 



^. 3; 



~s 



S <=; 






■ I 






■ri 



Sr/ /hc/ion ahout4Ff<^ 




y-/ 


^ K^^ 


y 


i^^ 




v§> 


^ 


^r 


^ 




S\ 




^ 








^- 




^ 




S! 





[PAGE FIFTY-ONE] 



PAINT REMOVAL RACK 

In the plan, as shown on page Fifty-three, of the rack for holding sections from 
which paint is to be beaten, it will be noted that the frame is to be of rigid con- 
struction, which prevents the racking and distorting of the section during the 
process. The usual method employed is to place the section on the rack, and then 
beat the face of the same with the tool shown on the plan. Care should be taken 
that the section is not beaten too hard. The paint which does not flake off under 
the blows of the tool may be readily scraped off with the chisel point of same. This 
chisel point should be kept well sharpened to facilitate rapid work. As shown on 
opposite page the tool is made from a piece of medium steel of 1 Yz'^Vs inch mater- 
ial and bent to make an offset at the handle of 2 J/2 inches, which keeps the hand 
clear when the tool is used to beat the section. The handle is made of two pieces 
of wood which are held in place by a winding of electricians tape. 



[P.\GE FIFTT-TWO] 



PAINT REMOVAL RACK 







/«•/»»«■ ««P HOLDINO SECTIONS ITHILC l?C:MOfll\IS OlD P/I/NT 






ll'AGE I"II"TY-THREEJ 





OFFICERS 




OF THE 




OUTDOOR ADVERTISING ASSOCIATION 


GEORGE 


J. SHERER President 




NORTHERN DISPLAY ADVERTISING CO. 




MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 


GEORGE 


FITCH Secretary 




130 SOUTH HUDSON AVE. 




ALBANY, N. Y. 


SAMUEL 


PRATT Treasurer 


NEWARK SIGN CO. 




NEWARK. N. J. 


JOHN S. 


HUMMER Attorney 


69 WEST WASHINGTON STREET 




CHICAGO, ILL. 


THOMAS 


CUSACK CO. Clearing House 




HARRISON AND LOOMIS STREETS 




CHICAGO, ILL. 



[PAGE FIFTY-FOUR] 



s^ 



I